The most sensible thing I’ve said

Posted on: March 9th, 2014 by Jess Flanagan

I don’t make a habit of referring directly to clients as I firmly believe in keeping private matters private. However, I have recently had the pleasure to meet such a charming young man and “say the most sensible thing I have heard in years” to him that, at least skeletally, I want to share our exchange with you.

His history and circumstances are irrelevant but suffice to say he has had a tough time over the past 4 years, cannot walk, needs support with all acts of personal care and aspects of daily living and there is evidence of exploitation from others and risk minimisation on his part. He tells me that his illness means he doesn’t have that long left to live.

Like many people before him, this chap has been assessed by services as lacking the mental capacity to make decisions concerning where he receives necessary care and treatment and is now deprived of his liberty under a Standard Authorisation, receiving that care and treatment in a specialist placement miles from his family. The story could belong to many vulnerable adults and these outline facts are no different to many we frequently see in Court of Protection judgments.

I will be sharing these comments with the parties and the court, so if anyone who recognises these circumstances and can identify him (and I have drafted this in such a way that only those with direct knowledge of the proceedings, not even the man himself, would have any idea who I am talking about), this is information that they will see anyway.

I listened to him clearly explain his background, his worries, his current misery and wishes and I advised him that due to his vulnerability, professionals have a duty to protect him from harm and meet his needs. I then went on to advise that the relevant law was not there to wrap him “in forensic cotton wool” (A favourite quote of mine from Mr Justice Hedley, paragraph 10 Re P [2013] EWHC 50) and explained to him the decisions in KK v CC v STCC and Manuela Sykes (see posts on the Sykes judgment and reference to supported decision making) and told him that both these ladies were allowed to go home from a residential placement, at least for a trial period.

I did so to illustrate the current judicial thinking in respect of protective decision making on behalf of people who may not be able to make decisions themselves, to give him some hope and to let him know that I understood and would support him in his application to challenge his circumstances. This is when he turned to his RPR and thanked her for introducing to me and, looking me straight in the eye said how those words which I will always now carry with me and that make my hard work worth it. He knows I understand him and tells me he trusts me. Being solicitor for P is such a unique and privileged position to be in. It also carries with it a lot of responsibility, but given his response to me and how driven I feel to fight for his right to be back with his family it’s a responsibility I welcome with open arms.

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